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Mountain Hydrology and Mass Movements

Dr. Manfred Stähli

Geschiebemessanlage Albula Tiefencastel

The Research Unit investigates natural hazard processes in mountainous areas, in particular the triggering and propagation of floods, sediment transport, landslides, debris flows and rock fall. Process studies on the scale of slopes, channels and catchments form the basis for the development of simulation models and of hazard assessment procedures and for the design of countermeasures. To this end worldwide unique observation systems are developed, such as a debris flow balance and geophone systems for bedload transport. Damage and damaging processes due to frequent and extreme events are assessed as prerequisites for the risk-based and sustainable management of natural hazards.

A second focus of the unit is on the estimation and prediction of snow and water resources, e.g. for hydropower production or early recognition of drought. The unit operates a snow hydrological service for federal and cantonal agencies and a drought information platform for a broad range of water users.

News

April 2015: New bedload-transport measurement system at Tiefencastel (river Albula) successfully taken into operation. see SCCER-SoE News.

25 Nov. 2014: Ongoing work in the field of hydropower research has been presented at the WSL Forum für Wissen, one of the main annual stakeholder events of WSL. Information.

11 Sep. 2014: News and video about our research on rock-fall trajectories

5 Sept. 2014: Exciting slope erosion observations in the Alptal (video by Antonius Golly, GFZ/WSL)

Recent publications

17. Aug. 2015: Publication on glacier mass loss in the Tien Shan in Nature Geoscience. (WSL-News)

April 2015: New review paper on Early Warning Systems for Rapid Mass Movements in NHESS.

Jan 2015: Two new publications on sedFlow, a tool for simulating fractional bedload transport in mountain streams, in Earth Surface Dynamics.

Subunits

FE Gebirgshydrologie WSL Sommer 2014

 

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