ForTran - Codes

  The available Fortran codess are organized as follows:

    7. Climate Data Analysis Programs
    8. Mowing Window Regression Programs
    9. Soil Profile Analysis Programs
  10. Testing predictive (simulated) maps
 
You can go to the the respective categories to check about available programs. A short descriprion is given. You can click on the program name to get a more detailed dicussion and a brief manual. At the same location you can download the source codes (and compiled versions for DOS) if you like to.



 7. Climate Data Analysis Programs

7.1 sum_srad.for This program allows to calculate simple daily, monthly, and yearly summaries of hourly radiation and climate parameters as decompressed from the SAMSON solar radiation CD. The program corrects errors (missing data), and reports the errors to a file. However, large strings of errors (many consecutive days) can result in wrong summaries. The error file should be checked for such errors and the data (summaries) should be checked accordingly. The program does not calculate correct transmittance values, since the calculated transmittance values are not sun-angle corrected. Do not input SAMSON data into this program if the data has been extracted using the tools provided on the CD. The extraction tool saves the data in a slightly different format, which is not compatible with sum_srad.for.
7.2 sum_tran.for This is an improved version of sum_srad.for. This routine allows analyzing the hourly SAMSON radiation data more comprehensively. However, the analysis of the climate variables as available in the same files has been dropped. However, the analysis of the transmittance has been improved, enabling the sun-angle correction of transmittance (and thus unlinking the transmittance from the current sun angle). There is a free available version of the hourly SAMSON data available on the web. This is a reduced version of the SAMSON-CD data, containing only the pure radiation data, but lacking the other climate variables. Sum_tran.for is specifically suited to analyze this data as well since it does not assume include climate variables. Do not input SAMSON data into this program if the data has been extracted using the tools provided on the CD. The extraction tool saves the data in a slightly different format, which is not compatible with sum_srad.for. If data is downloaded from the Web, simply decompress the data an follow the instruction below to analyze the data.
7.3 sunpos.for A very simple program that enables to calculate the position of the sun based on simple geographical data Lat/Lon, local time, local time meridian. From this input data the program generates values for local solar noon, solar altitude, azimuth, and zenith angle, as well as some other parameters (e.g. "mass of the atmosphere").
7.4 tau.for This is an equally simple tool to calculate the atmospheric attenuation due to various sun altitude angles. The program quotes for sun altitude angle and for vertical atmospheric transmittance and displays the resulting reduction in transmittivity, as well as some other variables (e.g. "mass of the atmosphere").
7.5 sum_snot.for This program enables to analyze and summarize daily SnoTel data that can be downloaded in the original form from the web. The data is provided in three different formats depending on the progress of installation of new measurement stations. The program is able to recognize the data format automatically, and to check and correct (somewhat) errors in the data. Even though the providers claim that the program is error-checked, there are numerous errors still inherent. The program checks for ca. 10 different data errors and writes the errors (including an error code) into an error-file. This enables to check and correct errors afterwards. The data output of monthly values contains absolute min/max temperature, average min/mean/max temperature, precipitation sum, and last spring-frost and first fall-frost (recorded in Julian days). This data can further be analyzed using nrm_clim.for.
7.6 nrm_clim.for This program allows to generate long-term climate normals (period is of choice) based on the output of sum_snot.for.
7.7 lattice.for This program allows to generate lattice coordinates to prepare point lattices to sample grid values (without interpolating when sampling lattices using LATTICESPOT).

 
 

 8. Mowing Window Regression Programs

8.1 mowinreg.for This program allows to calculate linear least-square regressions in a mowing window. The window size can be defined in the input, as well as the (in-) dependent variables. The input is read from the GRIDASCII-format, as generated when unloading GRID data to as AscII-file. The program can be submitted independent of any other procedures. However, the routine was designed to be used in a PRISM-downscaling procedure, as performed in an AML environment.

 
 

 9. Soil Profile Analysis Programs

9.1 soilprop.for This simple program enables to integrate layered soil profile data for available water holding capacity and soil permeability as provided on the web in the MUIR database. The program is not very much elaborated and needs some manual data preparation. Once prepared the program integrates the layered data into a summary per profile and soil type. If more than one profile is provided per soil type then it is the userís choice to manually integrate the summarized data into a single value, or to leave the information as generated from this routine.

 
 

 10. Testing predictive (simulated) maps

9.1 simtest.for SimTest is a simple program to analyze the accuracy of probabilities of simulated habitat distributions against observed species/community occurrences. SimTest calculates a number of different accuracy measures to support various goals in testing simulations of species distributions in the fields of ecology and conservation biology. The program reads a simple input file and generates a series of output files and a summary screen. SimTest is written in Fortran 90/95, and runs under DOS, Win98/ME//NT/2000, and Mac operating systems. Most of the measures used in this program are described in detail in FIELDING & BELL (1997), and in FIELDING (2000)..

 
 
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Last Updated: 9/24/03
By Niklaus E. Zimmermann